/ / 2 Zip Hip Bag – Free Sewing Pattern

2 Zip Hip Bag – Free Sewing Pattern

|


sling-bag.jpg

Sew a beautiful 2 Zipper Hip Bag (a.k.a. fanny pack, sling bag, waist wallet) using your favorite fabric and the same easy sewing techniques that I used on our free Triple Zip Bag sewing pattern and Designer Zipper Bags Video course.

When my kids first saw me sewing these, they were mortified.

‘Please, don’t wear that!’

‘Don’t make me one!’

‘Why, why, why???’

But then last weekend we went on a quick mini vacation for 3 days at a water park resort in Orlando. This was the handiest bag we owned and everyone asked me to carry their hotel key cards, phones, and even a can of sunscreen!

Plus – they saw so many other vacationers (kids, young people, and even ‘old people’ like me) wearing hip bags too (I would say 25% of the people at the park).

At the end of the first day, my 14 year old Chloe picked up my ‘fanny pack’ and said:

‘Wow, mom. Your’s is the prettiest one!’

This blog post has been converted to an optional PDF that’s optimized for printing. Find it here. The blog post below is totally free to read, print, and sew! Just hit CTRL +P on your computer to print. The Optimized for Printing PDF download for $2 is totally optional.


IMG_4582.jpg

I never wore mine as a sling bag like this, though. But I saw lots of other people doing it.


IMG_4315-2.jpg

The technique that I’m going to show you uses foam stabilizer that is sandwiched in between two layers of fabric and quilted.

But you don’t have to use that technique, if you’d rather use one of the pretty new vinyl or cork fabrics that are coming out. I have found that they don’t need a lining and they look fabulous.

You can find pretty vinyl fabrics like the one above at SewHungryHippie. I really like Fabric Funhouse for high quality cork fabric.


IMG_4532.jpg

Like the name 2 Zip Hip Bag implies, this waist bag has 2 zippered compartments. There is a large one in the front, and a flat hidden compartment in the bag that is great for money or key cards.

I used one yard of 1 1/2’’ wide waistband elastic for my bag because I love how comfortable it is. You could also use nylon webbing strap or make your own 1 1/2’’ wide belt if you so choose.

The elastic adjustable belt will fit waist sizes from about 25’’ – 40’’.

I also use hand bag zippers (zipper by the yard to be more precise). I’ll leave links for where you can buy them. You can also use regular size sewing zippers for a different overall look.

So let’s get sewing!


2 Zip Hip Bag – Free Sewing Pattern with a Photo Tutorial

You will need:

(I put a materials list for this project in my Amazon Storefront.)

About zippers:

You know I LOVE zippers by the yard because I use so many size 4.5 handbag zippers it is truly the most economical way to go.

If you choose to ignore my advice, you can also use any other #4.5 handbag zipper. Please buy zippers longer than the measurements specified so you can cut off the stoppers and trim it to just the right size.

Important: after cutting your zipper to the right size, sew back and forth 1/8’’ from each end to make new zipper stoppers out of thread.

Cutting Instructions:

All of my measurements are height x width. This is usually only important if your fabric is directional.

download the 2 zip hip bag pattern templates here

From your exterior fabric, cut:

  • 1 rectangle 13 1/2’’ x 11’’

  • 2 from the side flap template (1 reversed)

OPTIONAL: If you are using vinyl fabric instead of exterior fabric, cut:

  • 1 rectangle 2 3/4’’ x 10’’

  • 1 rectangle 5 1/4’’ x 10’’

  • 1 rectangle 4 1/2’’ x 10 1/2’’

  • 2 from the side flap template (1 reversed)

From your lining fabric, cut:

  • 1 rectangle 13 1/2’’ x 11’’ (not needed if using vinyl)

  • 2 from the side flap template (1 reversed)

  • 2 from the inside divider pattern template


IMG_4351.jpg


IMG_4356.jpg

Make the Quilted Piece (Watch Lesson 1 of my free Designer Zipper Bags video course to see how easy this is!)

Note: skip this step if you are using vinyl fabric or cork.

1. Place the wrong side of one of the 13 1/2’’ x 11’’ fabric pieces against the foam stabilizer piece of the same size. Machine baste around it 1/8’’ from the edge.

2. Place the wrong side of the remaining 13 1/2’’ x 11’’ fabric piece against the other side of the foam stabilizer. Machine baste around 1/8’’ from the edge.

3. Sew quilting lines all over this piece – any way you like! I used wavy lines with my walking foot.


IMG_4358.jpg

4. From this quilted piece, cut:

  • 1 rectangle 2 3/4’’ x 10’’

  • 1 rectangle 5 1/4’’ x 10’’

  • 1 rectangle 4 1/2’’ x 10 1/2’’

Machine baste 1/8’’ from the edges of these pieces to seal the edges.


IMG_4360.jpg


IMG_4364.jpg

Make the Back Zipper Panel:

Start here if you are using vinyl for the exterior fabric.

1. Place the 10’’ long zipper face down against the top edge of the 5 1/4’’ x 10’’ quilted (or vinyl) piece. Pin or clip in place.

2. Stitch with a 1/4’’ seam allowance.


IMG_4367.jpg


IMG_4370.jpg

3. From the back (lining side) of the piece, carefully trim away 1/8’’ from the foam and fabric layers behind the zipper tape. Do not cut the zipper tape. This is so the zipper tape will fold down against the inside of the pouch and cover the raw edge.


IMG_4371.jpg


IMG_4373.jpg

4. Finger press the zipper tape against the lining fabric. Sew along the edge of the zipper tape to secure and cover the raw edges.

Note: This can also be sewn from the front side. Simply press or finger press the zipper tape against the lining and then topstitch from the front 1/8’’ from the fold.


5. Place the top edge of the zipper face down against a long edge of the 2 3/4’’ x 10’’ quilted (or vinyl) piece (right sides together). Stitch with a 1/4’’ seam allowance, as before.


6. Trim away 1/8’’ of fabric and stabilizer behind the zipper tape and topstitch as before.

Set this piece aside for a few minutes.


IMG_4380.jpg

Attach the Inside Divider:

1. Place the two inside divider pieces wrong side together. Baste around them, sewing 1/8’’ from the edge.


IMG_4382.jpg


IMG_4386.jpg

2. Move the zipper slider on the back zipper panel to the center. Center the inside divider against the lining side of the back zipper panel. Pin in place (unless you are using vinyl – in which case, try to do this without pinning).

3. Trim around the inside divider so that the back zipper panel is the same size and shape.

4. Before removing the pins, baste all the way around this piece 1/8’’ from the edge to secure it together.


IMG_4391.jpg

5. Turn the back zipper panel over to the exterior side. Topstitch one more time right on top of the topstitching along the top of the zipper. This will help the inside divider from flopping around.


IMG_4393.jpg


IMG_4397.jpg

Make the Side Flaps:

1. Place each exterior fabric side flap right sides together with a matching lining fabric side flap. Stitch across the top straight edge and the bottom curved edge with a 1/4’’ seam allowance.

Trim the bottom curved edge with pinking shears, or clip notches along this edge using small scissors.

2. Turn each piece right side out and press flat.


IMG_4401.jpg


IMG_4403.jpg

3. Carefully turn the raw edges of the smaller opening to the inside by 1/4’’. Press. Leave the raw edges of the larger opening as-is.

4. Topstitch 1/8’’ from the top straight edge and the bottom curved edge. Baste the larger opening closed 1/8’’ from the edge.


IMG_4404.jpg

Repeat these steps for both side flaps.


IMG_4407.jpg

Make the Front Zipper Panel:

{These steps are the same as how you attached the bottom edge of the zipper for the back panel.}

1. Place the 10 1/2’’ long zipper face down against the top edge of the 4 1/2’’ x 10 1/2’’ quilted (or vinyl) piece. Pin or clip in place.

2. Stitch with a 1/4’’ seam allowance.

3. From the back (lining side) of the piece, carefully trim away 1/8’’ from the foam and fabric layers behind the zipper tape. Do not cut the zipper tape. This is so the zipper tape will fold down against the inside of the pouch and cover the raw edge.

4. Finger press the zipper tape against the lining fabric. Sew along the edge of the zipper tape to secure and cover the raw edges.

Note: This can also be sewn from the front side. Simply press or finger press the zipper tape against the lining and then topstitch from the front 1/8’’ from the fold.


IMG_4408.jpg

Assemble Your 2 Zip Hip Bag:

1. On the lining side, mark the center at the top and bottom of the front zipper panel and the back zipper panel.


IMG_4412.jpg


IMG_4420.jpg

1. Place the front zipper panel along the top edge of the back zipper panel with right sides together and matching up the top center marks. Pin or clip in place.

2. Moving from the center outward, pin or clip the top zipper tape only (not the side of the front zipper panel) around the top edge of the back zipper panel.

Make 1/4’’ clips about 1/2’’ apart into the zipper tape where it needs to curve around the edges.


IMG_4415.jpg

On each side, the front zipper tape should end about 1/2’’ away from the zipper on the back panel.

I the photo above you can see where I clipped into the zipper tape to help it curve around the edge.

Take note that you will start and stop sewing 1/4’’ away from the ends of the zipper tape on the front zipper panel.


IMG_4422.jpg

3. At this point I recommend switching to a zipper foot if you haven’t already.

Stitch the top zipper tape of the front zipper panel to the curved edge of the back zipper panel, starting and stopping 1/4’’ from each end.


IMG_4424-2.jpg


IMG_4425.jpg

4. Turn the bag over so you can work on the bottom curved seam. Pin or clip the pieces together, matching up the center marks.

5. Moving from the center outward, pin or clip the bottom edger of the front zipper panel around the bottom edge of the back zipper panel.

Make 1/4’’ clips about 1/2’’ apart into the straight edge of the top zipper panel where it needs to curve around the bottom zipper panel.


IMG_4431.jpg

6. Sew the straight edge to the curved edge using a 1/4’’ seam allowance. As before, begin and end sewing 1/4’’ from each corner on the front piece.


Insert the Side Flaps and Sew the Side Seams:

1. With the bag still inside out, lay it on your workspace with the flaps as seen above.

The front of the zipper bag is against the table, as well as the right side of both side flaps. The turned-in edges of the side flaps are pointing toward the bag.


IMG_4434.jpg

2. Carefully insert each side flap inside the bag through the side openings (smaller turned-under end first).

Line up all raw edges and pin or clip in place. You will need to flatten the front of the bag against the back of the bag. Depending on your seam allowances, there may be some pinching at the corners. This is no big deal.

Repeat with the other side flap on the other side of the bag.


IMG_4439.jpg

3. Turn the bag over and make sure the longer front zipper is at least halfway open.

You can also peek inside to make sure that now the front (exterior sides) of the flaps are facing up and they are both about even with the top of the back zipper.


IMG_4442.jpg


IMG_4444.jpg

4. When you have both sides pinned or clipped to your satisfaction, sew both seams with a 1/4’’ seam allowance.

If desired, turn your bag right side out and check that everything looks good. Then turn it inside out again to sew the seam binding.


IMG_4450.jpg

Bind the Raw Edges

If you have another favorite way of binding, feel free to do this step any way that you like. Below is my favorite binding method. You could also finish this seam with a serger or zig zag stitch.

1. Fold the yard of 2 1/2’’ wide or 2 1/4’’ wide bias binding in half with the wrong sides together.

Line the raw edges up with the raw edges of the inside seam.

Sew the binding around the bag with a 1/4’’ seam allowance. Leave a tail of binding at least 5’’ long at the start. Stop sewing 5-6’’ from where you started.


IMG_4457.jpg

2. Bring the binding together and fold the ends back where they meet. Cut away the extra binding 1/4’’ past the folds where they meet.


IMG_4465.jpg


3. Open the binding ends and place them right sides together. Stitch with a 1/4’’ seam allowance. You may have to fold the bag in half to achieve this. 🙂

4. Finger press the seam open and then fold the binding wrong sides together as before. Lay the binding flat against the bag and finish sewing it on.


IMG_4470.jpg

Examine the edges and curves of the bag. Trim to an even 1/4’’ seam allowance, if necessary.


IMG_4473.jpg

5. Flip the binding around to the other side of the seam. Stitch it down close to the fold.

Turn the bag right side out and press gently.


IMG_4476-2.jpg

Make the Adjustable Belt (or waist strap)

Note: This elastic adjustable belt will fit waist sizes from about 25’’ – 40’’. You may adjust the length of both pieces. If you are using nylon webbing straps instead of elastic pieces, then I suggest adding a few inches to each side to make up for the lack of stretch.

1. Cut the yard of waistband elastic into two pieces, 8’’ long and 28’’ long.

2. Thread the elastic through the female side of the buckle by pushing it down through the top opening and folding it back on itself.


IMG_4479.jpg

2. Fold the raw edge of the elastic under by about 1/2’’ and clip in place. Note that my folded under edge is almost 2’’ away from the buckle. This is so I won’t struggle to fit it under my sewing machine foot.


IMG_4492.jpg

3. Secure the elastic and hide the raw ends by sewing in a rectangle that is about 1 1/2’’ x 1/2’’.

Set this piece aside.


IMG_4480.jpg

Examine your triglide slide. If it has a raised edge like mine above, that is the top of the slide. If not – don’t worry about it!

The remaining two pieces of hardware (the triglide slide and the male end of the buckle) will be threaded from the bottom.


IMG_4484.jpg

4. Push one end of the longer piece of elastic up through the first opening on the bottom of the triglide slide and down through the other opening.

Then (without twisting the elastic), push the end up through the first opening on the male end of the buckle and down through the other opening.


IMG_4487.jpg

5. Loosen the elastic that is threaded through the triglide slide by pulling up the elastic on top about 2’’.

Now you will make a loop by threading the end of the elastic back up and down through the triglide slide in the exact same direction you did the first time.


IMG_4488.jpg

6. Push the elastic through about 2 – 2 1/2’’. Fold the raw edge under and clip the end of the elastic to itself (not to the elastic on top).


IMG_4491.jpg

Here is another view of that.


IMG_4498.jpg

7. Adjust the elastic so you can keep it out of the way while you stitch a rectangle to secure the end and hide the raw edges.


IMG_4501.jpg

7. Insert one end of each elastic piece into the folded under ends on the side flaps.

If you arrange your straps as seen above (looking at the under side of the bag and the belt pieces), then you can wear the bag on your right hip and the buckle will snap approximately at your left hip.


IMG_4507.jpg

8. Secure the belt pieces by sewing back and forth over the folded-under edges of the flap where the belt is inserted.


IMG_4510.jpg

Enjoy your beautiful 2 Zip Hip Bag! If you make one, be sure to snap a pic and show me by tagging me on Instagram @sewcanshe.


cross-body-bag-patterns.jpg

You might also like my collection of 5 Amazing (and free) Cross Body Bag Patterns.

Happy sewing!


Sharing is Caring!

Disclosure: some of my posts contain affiliate links. If you purchase something through one of those links I may receive a small commission, so thank you for supporting SewCanShe when you shop! All of the opinions are my own and I only suggest products that I actually use. 🙂

Similar Posts

8 Comments

  1. Wow! Beautiful work. Thanks for sharing your pattern. 🙂

  2. [object Object] says:

    Thank you so much for this awesome pattern. I volunteer at an animal shelter and use a fanny pack every day while walking dogs. I will be trying this pattern for sure!

  3. Personally, there are so many other nicer looking options for carrying stuff that I won’t ever be tempted to make one of these (and the trend of wearing of them across the chest is too bizarre for words), but I believe you should be thanked — as always — for coming up with these timely tutorials for everyone. So thank you, Caroline. 🙂

  4. What a cute pattern, i’ve been wanting to make a fanny pack for walks with my dog. I struggled with the binding, and it turned out smaller than expected, but it is adorable! Thank you for a fun project!

  5. Thank you so much for sharing this wonderful tutorial. My daughter wants a fanny pack for Christmas – and she’s getting one! The fanny pack (she calls it a "booty bag") looks very professional and I was so happy to learn the binding technique

  6. I keep coming back to this post! I made one for me, and I love to wear it during dog walks and on the beach. Now I’ve made 3 more for my friends and family and they are just so cute! I had to apologize to my mom for thinking she was so uncool to wear a fanny pack when I was a kid!

  7. The link for the templates for this 2 zipper Fanny pack is not working. I wanted to make this pack today. Please help, thank you so much for your great tutorials!

    1. Thanks for your patience while we update our servers. I fixed the link!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *