/ / Quilt Labels! {free printable}

Quilt Labels! {free printable}

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Every quilt you make needs a label.

Years down the road who will remember who made that quilt? Who did they make it for? And when? You might not even remember.

Plus if you decide to show a quilt, it will definitely need a label to ensure you get it back. Quilt labels are easy to make and there are lots of different ways. It’s basically a piece of fabric with information on it that is attached to the back of the quilt, usually in a bottom corner.


Last week I designed a simple label for my QuiltCon quilt and fused it to the back of the quilt. Actually, I designed 4 different labels and played with different colors before I picked the right one for my quilt.

Now I’m giving all the designs in all three colors to you!

{click here to get my free Quilt Labels printable}

and read on to see how to attach them.


You can actually print and use these labels however you want. This is how I did it. I’ve used Transfer Artist Paper (TAP) for several different projects and I love it. It’s easy and it creates a bold, crisp image.


Simply print your design (reversed) on the white side of the TAP


and then iron it onto a piece of fabric.


It’s easy to know that your image has transferred because the paper lifts off and doesn’t stick. If it sticks, iron for another 10 seconds and check again.


Then I applied HeatnBond Ultrahold to the other side of my label so I could fuse it to the quilt. If we ever start using and washing it regularly, I’ll hand sew the label down. But it is fused very well already.

And that’s it! Here are some other things to know:

  • these quilt labels are blank. You could edit the pdf files to add your own text (using Acrobat, Photoshop, or Elements) or…

  • the TAP accepts lots of different inks and paints so you can add to the designs before you transfer them (remember they will transfer in reverse)

  • you can also make blank labels and write on them with a permanent fabric pen.

Using printable fabric sheets might be a simpler option, but I have not tried them so I can’t say how well they work. Does anyone want to share their experience in the comments?

If you use these labels I hope you show me! Tag me on Instagram @sewcanshe so I can take a look.

Happy quilting,


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Disclosure: some of my posts contain affiliate links. If you purchase something through one of those links I may receive a small commission, so thank you for supporting SewCanShe when you shop! All of the opinions are my own and I only suggest products that I actually use. 🙂

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13 Comments

  1. Tea's Quilts says:

    Thank you for your label designs. I usually embroidery my label onto the backing fabric. But sometimes I have to attached the label by sewing it last using several other methods (EQ7, hand embroidery, fabric inking, just to name a few). So this will give me another alternative to document my quilts. When I use your labels, I will make sure I mention where I received the labels. I sure they will be a big hit.

  2. Joy McElroy says:

    Thank you for the printables AND how to use them, Caroline! Pinned! 🙂

  3. Thank you very much for the printable labels. This is one feature of my quilts that I still need to get comfortable with and I appreciate the blanks you provide to work with. Have a happy day! 🙂

  4. Using printable fusible fabric is another option. It goes through an inkjet printer like paper, and already has fusible bond on the back. And you don’t have to print in reverse. Probably the same result, just allows you to skip a few steps! I’ve used it for many different applications, especially in making quiet books for my grandchildren. I think it’s washable, but I don’t have experience with that. Thanks for the labels!

  5. Thanks so much for the tip on TAP – I’d never heard of it and I’m going to order some now!!!
    Love your stuff, Caroline!!! You are amazing!

  6. I use these labels all the time on my quilts. I actually type the wording inside the label, trace it onto muslin, heat set the ink, sew another piece of light weight fabric all around the edge, right sides together, then turn it right side out so I have a nice clean edge to stitch to the back of the quilt. It’s a long process but it looks so nice.

  7. [object Object] says:

    Thank you, I’ve actually taken these as a snapshot saved it as a picture and uploaded it into Cricut Design Space, then did a print and cut onto printable HTV so I had a wonderful iron-on with my words 🙂 and it cut out right on the line.

  8. Thanks so much for the labels and instructions Caroline. You must have been reading my mind. I was just about to google "how to make quilt labels". Question, can you print one label and use your own lettering and then later print another label from the sheet at another time? Or do you have to use an entire sheet and then hand write them in at the times you are wanting a label? Does that make sense? I always look forward to your posts. :o)

  9. I love your quilt labels… something I should start adding to my quilts since most are gifts to family. Question… the labels downloaded into a pdf file. How does one type onto a pdf doc? When I open it, I’m unable to edit it. Thanks for the info and the darling but simple (which I love) design.

    1. Hi Susan,
      A lot of PDF readers (even the free ones such as the latest Adobe Reader and Preview on Mac) allow you to add text blocks on top of a PDF. Then you can save or print the PDF with the text you have added in text blocks.

  10. If you have an embroidery machine; embroider on your backing before attaching to quilt your message. I usually create a small circular design with message and year and embroider it onto a corner of the quilt.

  11. I have used the printable fabric sheets successfully. What you have to read prior to purchase is whether they are washable. Some are not.

  12. Gloria Val Verde says:

    Are these oh so cute printable still available? I am new to quilting and these look simple and right up my alley.

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