How to Sew Mini Oven Mitts – Free Sewing Pattern!

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Learn how to sew mini oven mitts with my free sewing pattern! This easy to make oven mitt pattern uses cotton fabric and insulated batting to make oven mitts that that are as beautiful as they are functional. Now the classic quilted pot holder pattern is fresh and new and ready to help you to spruce up your kitchen or sew the perfect gift.

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I first saw sweet little oven mitts like this when I was shopping at my favorite Homegoods store and I bought some to match the Casserole Carrier that I gave my sister in law for Christmas.

After getting a closer look at how they were made, I knew that I had to make my own! That way I could personalize them to my own kitchen or any one that I wanted to sew them for using fabric from my stash.

You could sew them up with a matching apron too! Here are my 10 Favorite Apron Patterns.

Mini Oven Mitt Details

This pattern includes free templates (download link below). The materials list and cutting instructions are for 2 oven mitts. Who would ever want just one?

Besides a sewing machine and cutting tools, the main materials you’ll need for this simple sewing project is fabric, thin quilt batting, and insulated batting (the same batting that is used for potholders).

I’ll show you how to sew a ‘quilt sandwich’ with the of insulated quilt batting and thin cotton batting in between two pieces of quilting cotton. For this step, a walking foot is very helpful.

I do recommend using a heavy duty needle (size 16/100) because you will be sewing through thick layers when you are sewing the pot holders together. If you feel like your sewing machine will struggle, you can easily leave out the quilt batting. The insulated batting that I recommended below is very heat resistant and will make great potholders by itself, even without an extra layer of cotton batting to give it extra loft.

Will you sew these adorable oven mitts to keep in your own kitchen or to give as a hostess gift? Either way, let’s get sewing!

This Sewing Patttern is Fat Quarter Friendly!

I LOVE using fat quarters from my stash – especially extra fat quarters that I have left over from sewing fat quarter friendly quilts. You can use 18” x 22” fat quarters for the ‘quilt sandwich’ that you’ll sew for this pattern, but then you will need a little bit more coordinating fabric to make the cuff binding and the hanging loop. 3 coordinating fat quarters would be perfect for making 2 mini oven mitts.

Mini Oven Mitts Sewing Pattern

To make 2 mini oven mitts, you will need:

  • 1/3 yard of cotton fabric for the exterior*
  • 1/3 yard of cotton fabric for the lining*
  • 1/3 yard of insulated batting (I suggest Insul-bright batting)*
  • a 11” x 42” piece of thin quilt batting (I suggest Warm and Natural)*
  • a fabric marker or tailor’s chalk for marking
  • a walking foot (or dual feed foot) for your sewing machine – optional but highly recommended
  • an acrylic ruler, rotary cutter and cutting mat, scissors, pins, and coordinating cotton thread

*or 3 coordinating fat quarters: one for the exterior, one for the lining, and one for the cuff binding and hanging loops. If you are using fat quarters, your insulated batting and cotton batting pieces will need to be 18” x 22” too.

Cutting

If you are using regular yardage (not FQ)…

From the cotton fabric for the exterior, cut:

  • 1 rectangle 11” x width of fabric (approximately 42” – don’t worry about cutting off the selvages yet)
  • 2 strips 2” x 4” for the hanging loops
  • 2 strips 2 1/4” x 13 1/2” for the cuff bindings

From the cotton fabric for the lining, cut:

  • 1 rectangle 11” x width of fabric (approximately 42” – don’t worry about cutting off the selvages yet)

From the insulated batting, cut:

  • 1 rectangle 11” x 42”

From the thin cotton batting, cut:

  • 1 rectangle 11” x 42”

If you are using Fat Quarters…

Measure your fat quarters for the exterior and lining, measure them to make sure that they are at least 18” x 22” including the selvages. I leave my selvages on during the quilting step to give me a little extra fabric at the edges to hold on to, and in case the layers slip some.

From the third FQ, cut:

  • 2 strips 2” x 4” for the hanging loops
  • 2 strips 2 1/4” x 13 1/2” for the cuff bindings

From the insulated batting, cut:

  • 1 rectangle 18” x 22” (or the same size as your fat quarters)

From the thin cotton batting, cut:

  • 1 rectangle 18” x 22” (or the same size as your fat quarters)

Make the Quilt Sandwich

1. Lay the insulated batting piece on top of the thin cotton batting piece. Place the cotton fabric piece for your oven mitt exteriors on top and the lining fabric on the bottom. The wrong sides of the cotton fabric should be against the layers of batting.

Place lots of pins all the way around to hold the four layers together. Alternatively, you could use quilt basting spray (such as Spray n Bond) between all of the layers.

Notes:

  • If you are using fat quarters instead of yardage, make a quilt sandwich in the same manner, except all of your pieces will be 18” x 22” instead of 11” x 44”.
  • Insulbright is reversible, so it doesn’t matter which side of the insulated batting is against the fabric. This quilt sandwich will also be reversible, so you can make two potholders that look different – or turn the piece for the ‘mouth’ over and have the lining fabric show on the outside.

2. Quilt together the 4 layers of batting and fabric any way that you like.

This is how to use a walking foot to quilt a cross hatch design:

Start by marking a straight line across the quilt sandwich at a 45 degree angle. I used a hera marker that is hard to see in the pictures, but it was easy for me to see and the line didn’t need to be removed later.

Quilt a straight line along the mark that you made. Then use the seam guide for your walking foot to help you quilt parallel lines that are 1-2” apart. My lines are 1 1/4” apart.

After you have quilted parallel lines over the entire quilt sandwich, use your ruler and fabric marker to draw a new line that is going in the opposite direction. Quilt over the new marked line and then continue quilting parallel lines until the entire piece is covered in cross hatch quilting.

Tip: Remove the pins as you go and don’t worry if your fabric layers shift a little bit during quilting. This is expected and the piece is large enough to cut out all of the pattern pieces that you’ll need.

Cut out the Mitt Pieces using the Downloadable Templates

1. Print the free downloadable cutting templates (see above). Be sure to print at 100% (do not enlarge or reduce).

Cutting layout for yardage:

Cutting layout for fat quarters:

This photo also shows the 2 1/4” x 13 1/2” binding strips.

2. Use scissors to cut 2 from each template. This is enough for 2 mini oven mitts.

3. Sew around each piece 1/8” from the edge to seal the fabric around edges together. This will also flatten the edges a bit and make the seams less bulky.

Make the Hanging Loops and Bindings

1. Fold the 2” x 4” loop pieces in half lengthwise, wrong sides together, and press. Open and fold the long edges to the center, press. Fold each loop piece in half and press again to make a strip about 1/2” x 4”.

2. Topstitch along each piece about 1/8” away from the long folded edges.

Set the loop pieces aside for now.

3. Fold each 2 1/4” x 13 1/2” binding strip in half lengthwise, wrong sides together, and press.

4. Place the short ends of a binding strip together, right sides together. Sew the ends together with a 1/4” seam allowance.

5. Finger press the seam open and refold the strip as before so it makes a loop.

Repeat with the other binding strip. Set the binding pieces aside for now.

Sew the Mitt Pieces Together

The rest of this tutorial shows how to sew 1 mini oven mitt. Repeat to make the other one.

1. Lay a piece 2 and a piece 3 on your workspace with the lining side up.

Use the fabric marker or tailor’s chalk to make a mark on the side of each piece, 3” above the bottom straight edge.

2. Place a piece 1 and piece 2 right sides together. Pin from one marking to the other around the curved edge.

3. Sew the two pieces together with a 1/4” seam allowance. Start sewing at one marking and sew around the curved edge until you get to the other marking.

4. Fold back the unsewn part of piece 2 and place piece 3 on the other end of piece 1, right sides together. Pin around the curved edge.

Attach piece 3 in the same way. Start sewing at one marking and sew around the curved edge until you get to the other marking with a 1/4” seam allowance.

There was some ‘wiggle room’ left in between these pieces so you will be able to line up the ends of pieces 2 and 3 perfectly.

5. Line up the straight edges of pieces 2 and 3 and pin them together.

Then finish pinning pieces 2 and 3 to piece 1 to eliminate the gap or ‘wiggle room’ in between them.

You should be able to pin each side together for an additional 1/2” or so.

Place a pin in each corner so you can check that there is no gap between pieces 2 and 3.

6. Finish sewing pieces 2 and 3 to piece 1. Sew from the pin placed in the corner to the previous stitching in all 4 places.

6. Remove the mitt from your sewing machine and re-fold it so you can sew pieces 2 and 3 together along the side edges.

Sew one side edge together from the corner until you reach the previous stitching, using a 1/4” seam allowance. Backstitch a few times – the area near piece 1 will take extra stress.

Add the Hanging Loop

Add the hanging loop before you finish sewing pieces 2 and 3 together on the other side.

1. Fold a hanging loop piece in half with the raw edges together. Place it inside the mitt, between pieces 2 and 3. It should be about 1/2” below the straight edge that will be the opening of the mitt and the raw edges of the hanging loop should be lined up with the raw edges on the side of the mitt.

Pin or clip pieces 2 and 3 together with the hanging loop in between.

2. Finish sewing the remaining side edge together from the corner until you reach the previous stitching, using a 1/4” seam allowance and catching the hanging loop in the seam. Backstitch a few times as before.

3. Use a zig zag stitch to finish all of the seams.

Bind the Opening

1. With the oven mitt still inside out, place a binding loop over the cuff opening. Line up the raw edges and pin all the way around with 4-5 pins.

2. Place the opening of the mitt over the free arm of your sewing machine and sew all the way around with a 1/4” seam allowance.

3. Turn the mitt right side out. Fold the binding around the raw edges and pin it in place on the outside of the mitt.

4. Place the mitt on your free arm again and sew the binding close to the fold all the way around.

Repeat to make one more pretty oven mitt!

I would love to see the cute kitchen accessories you make with my mini oven mitt pattern! Please post a photo to instagram and tag me @sewcanshe so I can take a look!

xoxo,

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Disclosure: some of my posts contain affiliate links. If you purchase something through one of those links I may receive a small commission, so thank you for supporting SewCanShe when you shop! All of the opinions are my own and I only suggest products that I actually use. 🙂

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6 Comments

  1. Thank you! I’ve been looking forward to this pattern!

  2. Carol Otter says:

    Thank you! They will be so useful.

  3. Please don’t leave out the cotton batting layers to make the cotton sandwich thinner. I did that when I made some oven mitts and the insulbrite heated the cotton batting is needed for oven mitts.

    1. I found the same thing. I tried skipping the batting & it didn’t work.

  4. Are the sandwich layers – lining, insulbrite, batting then exterior fabric?

  5. Leslie Daniels says:

    Is it possible to use wrap and zap by warm natural instead of insul bright

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