How to Make a DIY Sewing Machine Cover – Free Pattern!

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Make your own sewing machine cover using my free sewing pattern! This easy to sew sewing machine cover pattern uses cotton fabric and flexible foam stabilizer to make a cover that is as beautiful as it is functional. I’ll show you how to make 3 different pockets and then you can decide how many pockets you want and where to put them. You can even choose no pockets at all if you want the fastest cover possible.

Whatever your style, I hope you use my free sewing machine cover pattern to make your sewing room fit your personality!

This blog post has been converted to an optional PDF that’s optimized for printing. Find it here. The blog post below is totally free to read, print, and sew! Just hit CTRL +P on your computer to print. The Optimized for Printing PDF download for $2 is totally optional.

2 Different Sizes

I’m also providing free pattern templates in 2 different sizes.

The templates and instructions for a regular sized cover will fit sewing machines up to 13” tall, 8” deep, and 17” in width.

The free templates and instructions for a large sewing machine cover will fit sewing machines up to 14” tall, 9” deep, and 21” in width.

The regular sized cover fits my Brother CS7000X and will fit most regular sized sewing machines.

The large sized cover fits my Bernina B770QE and Juki TL-2010Q. Make sure you compare your sewing machine to the measurements specified above before getting started!

I’ll show you lots of tips and tricks along the way to make this project beginner friendly and fun! My materials list includes links to the same products I used so you can get the same great results.

This is the most protective cover that I have made for my sewing machines. If you’d rather have the open-style sewing machine cover, check out this free tutorial. I hope you like both these free sewing machine cover patterns!

DIY Sewing Machine Cover Pattern Details

The tutorial instructs you to first sew a reversible ‘quilt sandwich’ with cotton fabric and flexible stabilizer. For this step, a walking foot is very helpful.

Then you can turn some pieces over (like the pockets and the handles) and show off the coordinating lining fabric. If you would rather, you can keep all of the lining fabric on the inside for a more uniform look.

As written, this pattern includes one main zippered pocket on the front with a very easy to install zipper, a quilted pocket on one side, and a mesh pocket on the other side.

By the way the fabrics in both of my sewing machine covers come from Tula Pink’s Curiouser and Curiouser collection of fabric.

I love mesh pockets because they stretch to hold a lot of items, and you can see what is inside!

But if you’d rather skip the mesh pocket, you will have enough materials to make quilted pockets for both sides of the sewing machine cover.

An Opening for the Handle

Some of my readers requested an opening at the top of the cover so they could reach their sewing machine handle. To me, this defeats the purpose of a sewing machine cover because dust will get in. Plus I seldomly move my sewing machines and when I do, I put them in a trolley that provides much more protection. So I did not put an opening at the top of either of my covers.

However, I do love to listen to my readers, so I wrote a separate tutorial showing how to cut the opening and bind it for a neat finish. I used scraps to demonstrate this technique. Learn how to make a bound opening here.

Easy Sewing Machine Cover Pattern

To make the regular sized sewing machine cover (for sewing machines up to 13” tall, 8” deep, and 17” wide), you will need:

  • 1 yard of cotton fabric for the exterior
  • 1 yard of cotton fabric for the lining (and pieces you want to flip over to show the other side)
  • 1/2 yard cotton fabric for the binding
  • a 36” x 42” piece of flexible foam stabilizer (such as ByAnnie Soft and Stable)*
  • 1 handbag zipper, 18” or longer (I used Zipper by the Yard)
  • a 9 1/2” x 9 1/2” piece of mesh fabric (for the mesh pocket)
  • 9 1/2” of fold over elastic, 5/8” wide (FOE, also for the mesh pocket)

To make the large sized sewing machine cover (for sewing machines up to 14” tall, 9” deep, and 21” wide), you will need:

  • 1 1/2 yards of cotton fabric for the exterior
  • 1 1/2 yards of cotton fabric for the lining (and pieces you want to flip over to show the other side)
  • 1/2 yard cotton fabric for the binding
  • 2 rectangles of flexible foam stabilizer, each 24” x 42” (such as ByAnnie Soft and Stable)*
  • 1 handbag zipper, 22” or longer (I used Zipper by the Yard)
  • a 10” x 10” piece of mesh fabric (for the mesh pocket)
  • 10” of fold over elastic, 5/8” wide (FOE, also for the mesh pocket)

You will also need:

  • a heavy duty sewing machine needle (100/16 suggested)
  • a fabric marking pen
  • a walking foot (or dual feed foot) for your sewing machine – optional but highly recommended
  • an acrylic ruler, rotary cutter and cutting mat, scissors, pins, wonderclips and coordinating thread
  • a sewing stiletto

Make a Quilt Sandwich (or 2 for the Large Cover)

If you are making the regular size cover…

Measure your pieces of main fabric and lining fabric to ensure they are 36” x 42” before quilting them to the flexible foam stabilizer.

If you are making the large size cover…

For the large cover, you’ll need to make 2 quilted pieces. Cut your main fabric and lining fabric pieces in half so that you have:

  • 2 main fabric pieces 24” x 42”
  • 2 lining fabric pieces 24” x 42”

Quilting

See more about how to baste fabric to flexible foam stabilizer.

1. Smooth the main piece of fabric over the flexible foam stabilizer piece that is the same size. The wrong side of the cotton fabric should be against the stabilizer. Baste around the edges with a 1/4” seam allowance.

Smooth the lining fabric piece against the other side of the stabilizer (with the wrong side of the fabric against the stabilizer) and baste around the edges in the same way.

Alternatively, you could use quilt basting spray (such as Spray n Bond) between all of the layers.

Note: This photo shows the same technique on a different project.

2. After basting the layers together, quilt them using any quilting pattern. Straight line quilting with your walking foot is easy. I also enjoy wavy lines and free motion meandering.

Please note that you will only need to make one quilted piece if you are sewing the regular sized cover. For the large sized cover, you will need to make 2 quilted pieces (each 24” x 42”).

Cutting

The following pieces are cut from your quilt sandwich(es). Be sure to complete the previous step before moving on to cut out these pieces.

If you are making the regular size cover…

Cut:

  • 1 rectangle 17” x 33” (the main body piece)
  • 2 from the pattern template (the side pieces – click the link above to download the free templates)
  • 1 rectangle 8 1/2” x 17” (the front zipper pocket)
  • 1 square 8 1/2” x 8 1/2” (the quilted side pocket)
  • 2 rectangles 1 1/4” x 8 1/2” (the handles)

Cutting layout for the regular size cover:

If you are making the large size cover…

Cut:

  • 1 rectangle 21” x 35” (the main body piece)
  • 2 from the pattern template (the side panels – click the link above to download the free templates)
  • 1 rectangle 9” x 21” (the front zipper pocket)
  • 1 square 9” x 9” (the quilted side pocket)
  • 2 rectangles 1 1/4” x 9” (the handles)

Cutting layout for the large cover:

Ideas:

  • If you are going to add a bound handle opening to your cover, do so now.
  • With careful cutting you will have enough material to cut 2 quilted side pockets (instead of 1 quilted side pocket and 1 mesh side pocket).
  • If you are willing to skip the quilted side pockets, you have enough material to make 2 large zippered pockets (one on the front and one on the back).
  • Use any leftover quilted material to make Designer Zipper Bags using my free video course.

Use a long basting stitch to sew around all of the edges of the quilted pieces to ‘seal’ the edges and prevent separation. Baste approximately 1/8” from the edge.

How to cut and join the binding strips…

The following instructions show how to cut your binding for the least number of joins and the most efficient use of your fabric.

1. You will need bias binding to bind around the curved side edges of the cover. The rest of the edges are straight so bias binding is not necessary.

Use the 45 degree angle on your ruler to cut 3 strips, 2 1/4” wide, on the bias from the 1/2 yard piece of binding fabric. Place these 3 strips as far to the right side of your fabric as possible so that your strips are as long as possible, and still leave as much fabric as you can on the left side.

Set aside the leftover triangle of fabric at the top right. You can cut from it if any of your pieces are not long enough (explained below).

Join the three binding strips at the ends using a 1/4” seam allowance. Press the seams open.

Measure the length of bias binding after sewing the three pieces together. If you are making the regular sized cover, you need at least 66” of bias binding. If you are making the large cover, you need at least 70” of bias binding. If this strip is not long enough, cut another 2 1/4” wide strip from the bias edge of the leftover triangle and attach it to your long bias strip.

Cut the long bias strip in half to make 2 pieces (each at least 33” long for the regular cover or at least 35” long for the large cover).

Fold each binding strip in half lengthwise and press. Set these pieces aside. They are for binding the curved sides later.

2. The rest of our binding will be ‘straight cut binding.’

From the bottom edge of the remaining large fabric piece, cut 2 strips that are 2 1/4” wide.

Join the two strips at the ends using a 1/4” seam allowance. Press the seams open.

Measure the length the strip after sewing the two pieces together. If you are making the regular sized cover, you need at least 53” of binding. If you are making the large cover, you need at least 62” of binding. If this strip is not long enough, cut another 2 1/4” wide strip from the straight edge of the leftover triangle and attach it to your long strip.

Fold the binding strip in half lengthwise and press. Set it aside. It is for binding the bottom edge of the cover.

3. From the remaining binding fabric cut:

For the regular sized cover…

  • 2 strips 2” x 18” for binding the zippered pocket
  • 1 strip 2” x 9” for the quilted side pocket
  • 4 strips 2” x 9” for binding the handles

For the large sized cover…

  • 2 strips 2” x 22” for binding the zippered pocket
  • 1 strip 2” x 9 1/2” for the quilted side pocket
  • 4 strips 2” x 9 1/2” for binding the handles

Fold each binding strip in half lengthwise and press. I suggest keeping your binding strips together with the quilted pieces to which they will be attached to help you keep organized.

Make the Side Quilted Pocket

1. Lay the square side pocket piece on your workspace with the lining side up (or the side that you want to be the inside of the pocket). Place the matching (2” x 9” or 2” x 9 1/2”) binding strip on top with the raw edges lined up with the top edge of the pocket. Use wonderclips to hold the layers in place.

Attach the binding to the top edge with a 1/4” seam allowance.

2. Flip the binding over to the other side of the pocket. Topstitch it down close to the folded edge.

Trim away the extra binding ends.

3. Lay the quilted pocket on top of one of the side panels, lining up the bottom edges. Use pins or clips to secure the pocket.

Baste around the sides and bottom edges 1/8” from the edge.

Make the Large Zippered Pocket

For this step you will need the large rectangular pocket piece, the two matching binding strips, and the the zipper. If you are using zipper by the yard, put your slider on the zipper and cut a piece of zipper that is 1” wider than the pocket piece. Sew across the ends of the zipper so that the zipper slider won’t accidentally come off.

1. Lay the large pocket piece on your workspace with the lining side up (or the side that you want to be the inside of the pocket). Place a matching (2” x 18” or 2” x 22”) binding strip on top with the raw edges lined up with the top edge of the pocket. Use wonderclips to hold the layers in place.

Sew the binding to the top edge with a 1/4” seam allowance.

Flip the binding over to the other side of the pocket. Topstitch it down close to the folded edge.

2. Pin or clip the remaining binding strip (that is the same length as the zipper) against the wrong side of the zipper with the raw edges lined up with the top edge of the zipper.

Attach a zipper foot to your sewing machine. Sew the binding strip to the wrong side of the zipper with a 1/4” seam allowance.

Fold the binding over to the right side of the zipper. Topstitch it down close to the folded edge.

3. Place the zipper (with a bound top edge) on your workspace. Lay the long pocket on top, centering it on the zipper (which is 1” wider than the pocket to give you some wiggle room).

Arrange the bound edge of the pocket on so that it is the same distance from the zipper teeth as the binding on the top edge of the zipper.

Use lots of pins to pin the pocket piece to the zipper.

4. Topstitch along the top edge of the binding on the pocket, attaching the pocket to the zipper.

5. Lay the large main body piece. on your workspace vertically (right side up). Place the zippered pocket piece on top, lining up the bottom edge of the pocket with one of the short ends of the body piece.

Use pins or clips to secure the raw edges together. Then use lots of pins to secure the bound edge of the zipper to the body piece.

6. Topstitch along the top edge of the zipper binding to attach it to the body piece.

Then baste around the 3 raw edges of the pocket to secure all the layers together 1/8” from the edge.

Trim away the ends of the zipper even with the body piece. Sew across the ends of the zipper again (1/8” from the ends) to prevent the zipper slider from coming off.

Make and Attach the Mesh Pocket

The mesh pocket is optional (as are all the pockets). Since mesh can be slippery to cut, the mesh pieces are 1” larger than needed. You will trim away the extra after the pocket is attached.

1. Wrap the fold over elastic (FOE) around the top edge of the square mesh piece. Secure it in place with wonderclips.

Sew along the edge of the folded elastic, stretching the elastic very slightly as you sew.

Tip: if you can, move the needle of your sewing machine to the right so the elastic will be over one of the feed dogs and move smoothly as you sew.

Watch me demonstrate sewing fold over elastic to a mesh fabric pocket on YouTube.

2. Lay the mesh pocket over the bottom part of the remaining side panel. Allow the extra mesh to overlap the pocket as needed. Secure with wonderclips or pins.

Sew the sides and bottom edge of the mesh pocket to the side panel, sewing 1/8” away from the edges of the panel.

Trim away the extra mesh and elastic even with the edges of the side panel.

Make the Side Handles

1. Use the four remaining binding strips to bind the long edges on both handle pieces. Follow the same binding technique used on the pocket pieces.

2. Pin or clip the handles to the side panels 2 1/2” below the top edge. Baste the sides of the handles in place 1/8” from the raw edges.

Sew the Sewing Machine Cover Together

1. Use the fabric marking pen to mark the center of each side panel at the top.

2. Fold the main body piece in half with the short ends together to help you find the center. Mark the center of the body piece on both (long) sides.

3. Pin or clip a side panel to the main body piece, wrong sides together:

  • First match up the center mark on the side panel with a center mark on the long edge of the body piece. Pin or clip the centers together.
  • Then pin or clip the corners of the side panel to the corners of the body piece.
  • Place pins or clips along the straight edges.
  • Use scissors to clip 1/4” cuts into the straight edge of the body piece where it needs to curve around the side panel. These cuts should be 1/4” – 1/2” apart.
  • Use as many wonderclips or pins as needed to hold the corner in place.

4. Sew the side panel to the body piece with a 1/4” seam allowance. Go slowly and remove the clips or pins as you approach them.

Use the sewing stiletto to help you keep the edges together, especially around the curves.

Repeat these steps to attach the remaining side panel in the same manner.

Bind the Curved Edges

The two bias cut binding strips were saved for binding the curved side edges. You’ll use them now.

1. Pin or clip a folded and pressed bias cut strip around the side edge with the raw edges lined up. You should have some extra bias trim leftover.

2. Sew the bias trim to the side of the cover with a 1/4” seam allowance. You may need to adjust it as you remove the clips so that it is sewn smoothly to the cover.

3. Fold the binding around and against the main part of the cover. Topstitch it down close to the fold. Trim away the extra bias binding.

Repeat to bind the other curved side edge with the remaining bias cut strip that has been folded and pressed.

Bind the Bottom Edge

Tip: Before sewing binding to the bottom edge, use a hammer to make the previously bound seams easier to sew over. Just pound them 4-5 times. Believe me, it works!

I found it easiest if I pounded the seams flat without letting them fold over to one side or another. Then the new binding around the bottom edge didn’t have to go over a huge lump (just a little lump!).

1. Leaving about 4” of binding free, begin sewing the binding to the bottom edge of the cover on the inside (lining). I considered it best to begin sewing the binding to the back edge.

You can turn the cover inside out before sewing the binding to the bottom edge, but I did not find it necessary.

Sew the binding all the way around until you are about 8-10” away from the place where you started sewing. Remove the cover from your sewing machine.

2. Bring the ends of the binding together and fold them back. Crease the folds where the binding ends meet.

Trim away the extra binding 1/4” past each creased fold.

3. Place the ends of the binding together and stitch with a 1/4” seam allowance.

4. Finger press the seam open. Re-fold the binding as before and finish sewing it to the inside edge of the cover.

5. Turn the binding over to the front (right side) of the cover. Topstitch it down close to the fold.

Fall in love with your new sewing machine cover!

I would love to see the beautiful sewing machine covers you make with my free pattern! Please post a photo to instagram and tag me @sewcanshe so I can take a look!

xoxo,

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Disclosure: some of my posts contain affiliate links. If you purchase something through one of those links I may receive a small commission, so thank you for supporting SewCanShe when you shop! All of the opinions are my own and I only suggest products that I actually use. 🙂

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5 Comments

  1. Hi. Thank you for the tutorial. I don’t know if it would work but instead of cutting out a rectangle in the top for the handle could you just cut 3 sides and then install a zipper so that it’s still fully covered but you could open it to access the handle if you wanted to? I’m new to sewing with zippers so I’m not sure it would work making two 90 degree turns.

  2. Peg Dunayer says:

    A flap to cover the opening, secured with Velcro might work.

  3. Simone Baxter says:

    Where can I buy the fabric used in the making of these covers?

  4. Pauline Benoit says:

    Bonjour
    je nouvelle arrivée avec toi
    je n’ai pas tout compris tout d’un seul coup mais ça va
    j’adore tout ces dossier de couture je sais que je vais en apprendre énormément
    Merci Merci

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